BOOKER T : L’architecte

booker T

Booker T.Jones est l’un des architecte de la soul à Memphis dans les 60’s. Comme leader de la formation “Booker T. & the MG’s”, il a enregistré pour les stars du label “Stax“.

Mais, ce géant de la soul est également un producteur, compositeur et un arrangeur qui a accompli un travail remarquable avec Willie Nelson, John Lee Hooker, Bill Withers ou encore les Roots.

Il est né à Memphis en 1944. Ses débuts se font dans le jazz avec Phineas Newborn pendant ses années universitaires. En 1960, il est recruté par le label “Satellite” (qui deviendra “Stax”) pour jouer du saxophone avec Rufus et Carla Thomas. Lorsque “Satellite” devient “Stax”, Booker T. devient membre du groupe “maison” aux côtés de Steve Cropper, Lewis Steinberg et Al Jackson. Le groupe est baptisé “MG’s” (Memphis Group) et accompagne Otis Redding, Sam & Dave, Eddie Floyd, Albert King et d’autres stars du label. Des enregistrements se font également sous leur propre nom comme le fameux “Green Onions”, une des plus fortes ventes “live” de l’histoire de la soul.

A cause de disputes internes, le groupe est au bord de la rupture à la fin des années 60. En 1970, Booker s’installe à Los Angeles. Il est très occupé grâce à des collaborations avec Bob Dylan, Steven Stills, Kris Kristofferson et Rita Coolidge. En 1971, il produit un album majeur pour Bill Withers : “Just As I Am”. Sur cet album, on trouve les classiques “Ain’t No Sunshine” et “Grandma’s Hands”. En 1978, il enregistre son premier album solo, “Try And Love Again” et il connaît également un autre gros succès comme producteur avec Willie Nelson et son album “Stardust”.

Ce nouvel album est son dixième en solo et il marque son retour sur le label “Stax”. Il a tout écrit ou co-écrit et cet album ressemble à un album “duo” puisque il y a un invité sur chaque titre ou presque. De belles ballades comme “Broken Heart” enregistré avec Jay James ou “Your Love Is No Love” enregistré avec Ty Taylor et le groupe Vintage Trouble. Les meilleurs titres sont les instrumentaux comme “Feel Good” (très soul/jazz) ou le “Austin City Blues” beaucoup plus funk / blues avec Gary Clark Jr à la guitare. Rappelons ici la présence de Bobby Ross Avila à la production. Celui-ci avait fait ses débuts sur le label “Perspective” avec Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis aux milieu des années 90. Son premier album est magistral. Il donne ici une couleur R&B plus moderne. Une oeuvre honnête à découvrir.

FOR OUR ENGLISH FRIENDS

Booker T. Jones was one of the architects of the Memphis soul sound of the 1960s as the leader ofBooker T. & the MG’s, who scored a number of hits on their own as well as serving as the Stax Records house band. But Jones‘ accomplishments don’t stop there, and as a producer, songwriter, arranger, and instrumentalist, he’s worked with a remarkable variety of artists, from Willie Nelson to John Lee Hooker, from Soul Asylum to the Roots.

Booker T. Jones was born in Memphis, Tennessee on November 12, 1944. Jones developed an keen interest in music as a boy; while working a paper route, he used to pass by the house of jazz pianistPhineas Newborn, and would often stop and listen to him practice as he folded newspapers.  In 1960, Jones, a frequent customer at Memphis’ Satellite Record Shop, was recruited to play sax on a Rufus and Carla Thomasrecording session when the proprietors of the store, Estelle Axton and Jim Stewart, decided to start their own record label. The label soon evolved into Stax Records, and Jones, along with guitarist Steve Cropper (who was managing the record store when he met Jones), bassist Lewis Steinberg (later replaced by Donald “Duck” Dunn), and drummer Al Jackson Jr., would form the MG’s, who would back up Stax artists Otis ReddingSam & DaveEddie FloydAlbert King, and many others, as well as releasing a steady stream of instrumental recordings on their own, including the smash hit “Green Onions.”

Because of internal disputes at Stax, the group was on the verge of breaking up, and in 1970, Jones relocated to Los Angeles.  Jones stayed busy with session work, playing on albums by Bob DylanSteven StillsKris Kristofferson, andRita Coolidge. The same year, Jones produced Just as I Am, the outstanding debut album by Bill Withers, which featured the hits “Ain’t No Sunshine” and “Grandma’s Hands.” In 1978, Jones released his first solo album, Try and Love Again, and enjoyed one of his biggest successes as a producer with Willie Nelson‘s Stardust, a collection of pop standards that established Nelson as one of country’s biggest crossover acts.

Sound the Alarm is Jones‘ tenth solo album since leaving Stax, and it returns him to the label, now owned by Concord Records, a dozen years and change into the 21st century. Homecomings are nice, and it makes for a nice press hook for this outing, but anyone expecting some vintage-styled Memphis soul here is going to be disappointed, because there isn’t much of it. Jones, who wrote or co-wrote every song on the album, has brought in several guests to help him out, and while it isn’t exactly a duets album, it’s pretty close, and the focus is hardly on Jones and his playing. There are a couple of nice urban R&B love ballads like “Broken Heart,” which features Jay James on vocals, and “Your Love Is No Love,” done with the group Vintage Trouble and spotlighting Ty Taylor on vocals, but most of the other tracks with lead vocals have little real impact or presence. The best tracks here by far are the handful of instrumentals, including the soul-jazz-like “Feel Good,” the funky and bluesy “Austin City Blues” with Gary Clark, Jr. on guitar. There’s nothing wrong with trying to get a more contemporary sound and feel (the album was co-produced by Jones and brothers Bobby Ross and Issiah “IZ” Avila), of course, but when you’reBooker T. Jones, maybe you shouldn’t worry about that. After all, the funky soul groove template thatJones helped create in Memphis some 40-plus years ago never really goes out of style. One wishes there were more of that here.

 

Laisser un commentaire

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.